twicetwice

3D-printed vertebra used in spine surgery

"Using existing technology, the patient’s head needs to be framed with pins after surgery," as his head cannot touch the bed when he is resting for at least three months, he explained. "But with 3D printing technology, we can simulate the shape of the vertebra, which is much stronger and more convenient than traditional methods."
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3D-printed vertebra used in spine surgery

"Using existing technology, the patient’s head needs to be framed with pins after surgery," as his head cannot touch the bed when he is resting for at least three months, he explained. "But with 3D printing technology, we can simulate the shape of the vertebra, which is much stronger and more convenient than traditional methods."
ZoomInfo

3D-printed vertebra used in spine surgery

"Using existing technology, the patient’s head needs to be framed with pins after surgery," as his head cannot touch the bed when he is resting for at least three months, he explained. "But with 3D printing technology, we can simulate the shape of the vertebra, which is much stronger and more convenient than traditional methods."

Zaffle

So the origin of the name Viaduct Harbour comes from “Viaduct Basin”, and the origin of that is a bit odd, but straightforward.

In the early 1900s, as ships were getting much larger, the Auckland Harbour Board had to accommodate these larger ships, traditionally by dredging deeper channels and building bigger wharves. Instead they tried the idea of instead having the large ships moor in the harbour, and have them unload on to smaller tender ships, which then took the goods to/from specially built wharves. This was a failure, primarily because the cargo companies refused to cooperate.

So where does viaduct come in? This special wharf area was called the Viaduct Lighter Basin. A viaduct is a bridge across land. This approach was like a bridge for ships cargo across water.. Sort of.

Yeah, ok, it’s a bit odd. But that’s the reason.

TIL … 

Lauren Archer

X’s are everywhere in user interface (UI) design. A powerful symbol, [x] is capable of closing windows and popups, toolbars and tabs and anything else that might otherwise be cluttering up your screen.

Clicking on [x] to close a feature has become an instinctual part of using a computer and a standard in web and software design. Although it may seem like the ubiquitous [x] has always been a part of Graphical User Interfaces (GUI), a quick jaunt through the history of GUIs reveals that this actually isn’t the case.

So where and when did the [x] first enter into the UI lexicon?

via X to Close

Great idea, which combines AR, gesture based operations, and mobile phone OSes all into one, and all with existing technology too!  

Not sure about it being safe, on account of it being the same tech that pilots use, but great to see a non-proprietary solution for something which is definitely becoming a trend in tech.  

https://www.navdy.com/