twicetwice

parislemon:

markcoatney:

washingtonpost:

silentgiantla:

Animated artwork by Rebecca Mock
Fine, detailed and subtle animated artwork created by New York illustrator Rebecca Mock. Apparently the animated gif back to stay, gradually more and more people are exploring this old format and customers asking for shouting. Several of these illustrations were created for the New York Times or The Warlus magazine.

Beautiful gif art. <3

Oh my Lord. We have to have these at AJAM.

Lovely.
ZoomInfo
parislemon:

markcoatney:

washingtonpost:

silentgiantla:

Animated artwork by Rebecca Mock
Fine, detailed and subtle animated artwork created by New York illustrator Rebecca Mock. Apparently the animated gif back to stay, gradually more and more people are exploring this old format and customers asking for shouting. Several of these illustrations were created for the New York Times or The Warlus magazine.

Beautiful gif art. <3

Oh my Lord. We have to have these at AJAM.

Lovely.
ZoomInfo
parislemon:

markcoatney:

washingtonpost:

silentgiantla:

Animated artwork by Rebecca Mock
Fine, detailed and subtle animated artwork created by New York illustrator Rebecca Mock. Apparently the animated gif back to stay, gradually more and more people are exploring this old format and customers asking for shouting. Several of these illustrations were created for the New York Times or The Warlus magazine.

Beautiful gif art. <3

Oh my Lord. We have to have these at AJAM.

Lovely.
ZoomInfo
parislemon:

markcoatney:

washingtonpost:

silentgiantla:

Animated artwork by Rebecca Mock
Fine, detailed and subtle animated artwork created by New York illustrator Rebecca Mock. Apparently the animated gif back to stay, gradually more and more people are exploring this old format and customers asking for shouting. Several of these illustrations were created for the New York Times or The Warlus magazine.

Beautiful gif art. <3

Oh my Lord. We have to have these at AJAM.

Lovely.
ZoomInfo

parislemon:

markcoatney:

washingtonpost:

silentgiantla:

Animated artwork by Rebecca Mock

Fine, detailed and subtle animated artwork created by New York illustrator Rebecca Mock. Apparently the animated gif back to stay, gradually more and more people are exploring this old format and customers asking for shouting. Several of these illustrations were created for the New York Times or The Warlus magazine.

Beautiful gif art. <3

Oh my Lord. We have to have these at AJAM.

Lovely.

Joshua Topolsky reporting via The Verge, on the Facebook Acquisition of Oculus 

Somewhere nearby, you hear music. You like the beat —a strong four-four with an undulating series of power chords atop. It sounds like something your parents used to listen to, one of the classics like Katy Perry. A Spotify logo materializes in your HUD displaying the track name and artist. Good thing you connected your account. Suddenly your Facesuit vibrates across the shoulders — a message is incoming

Jim Wicks on The Verge, discussing the new Moto 360 smart watch

And you sit there and you think about making it a little bit thinner, or a little bit bigger, a little bit heavier — you work for all those things and you still get that kind of feeling. And then finally we realized we’re not going to break through that ceiling, even with our peers, if we can’t get out of the ‘eh’ zone

This does make me wonder, has the trend we’ve been seeing in the last 5 years of larger and larger watch faces been a subtle preparation for the smart watch?

Flying the world&#8217;s fastest plane: Behind the stick of the SR-71

We&#8217;d refuel twice just to get up there. You would get a couple of sunsets and sunrises, because at those northern latitudes often you would see day to night, and then a terminator line, almost like a black velvet curtain where you can see how it&#8217;s light on this side, and dark on the other side. It&#8217;s the most amazing thing you can imagine to see that

So much gold in this interview for one of the most well known jets in avionics.  The best thing I love was that it was never weaponized and was used purely for reconnaissance, designed for just pure speed with absolutely no defensive or offensive capabilities at all.  
If a missile was ever locked on, it would just outrun it!
via SB Nation
ZoomInfo
Flying the world&#8217;s fastest plane: Behind the stick of the SR-71

We&#8217;d refuel twice just to get up there. You would get a couple of sunsets and sunrises, because at those northern latitudes often you would see day to night, and then a terminator line, almost like a black velvet curtain where you can see how it&#8217;s light on this side, and dark on the other side. It&#8217;s the most amazing thing you can imagine to see that

So much gold in this interview for one of the most well known jets in avionics.  The best thing I love was that it was never weaponized and was used purely for reconnaissance, designed for just pure speed with absolutely no defensive or offensive capabilities at all.  
If a missile was ever locked on, it would just outrun it!
via SB Nation
ZoomInfo
Flying the world&#8217;s fastest plane: Behind the stick of the SR-71

We&#8217;d refuel twice just to get up there. You would get a couple of sunsets and sunrises, because at those northern latitudes often you would see day to night, and then a terminator line, almost like a black velvet curtain where you can see how it&#8217;s light on this side, and dark on the other side. It&#8217;s the most amazing thing you can imagine to see that

So much gold in this interview for one of the most well known jets in avionics.  The best thing I love was that it was never weaponized and was used purely for reconnaissance, designed for just pure speed with absolutely no defensive or offensive capabilities at all.  
If a missile was ever locked on, it would just outrun it!
via SB Nation
ZoomInfo
Flying the world&#8217;s fastest plane: Behind the stick of the SR-71

We&#8217;d refuel twice just to get up there. You would get a couple of sunsets and sunrises, because at those northern latitudes often you would see day to night, and then a terminator line, almost like a black velvet curtain where you can see how it&#8217;s light on this side, and dark on the other side. It&#8217;s the most amazing thing you can imagine to see that

So much gold in this interview for one of the most well known jets in avionics.  The best thing I love was that it was never weaponized and was used purely for reconnaissance, designed for just pure speed with absolutely no defensive or offensive capabilities at all.  
If a missile was ever locked on, it would just outrun it!
via SB Nation
ZoomInfo

Flying the world’s fastest plane: Behind the stick of the SR-71

We’d refuel twice just to get up there. You would get a couple of sunsets and sunrises, because at those northern latitudes often you would see day to night, and then a terminator line, almost like a black velvet curtain where you can see how it’s light on this side, and dark on the other side. It’s the most amazing thing you can imagine to see that

So much gold in this interview for one of the most well known jets in avionics.  The best thing I love was that it was never weaponized and was used purely for reconnaissance, designed for just pure speed with absolutely no defensive or offensive capabilities at all.  

If a missile was ever locked on, it would just outrun it!

via SB Nation


All told, the sequence clocks in at around six minutes. Fukunaga and the crew ran through the whole thing seven times while the cameras were rolling. The director built in possible edit points if two takes had to be combined to make the perfect version of the shot, but anyone who is wondering should know that the sequence everyone saw in the episode is, in fact, a true single take and one of the great achievements of filmmaking for television - True Detective: How Did They Pull Off That Final Shot?
ZoomInfo

All told, the sequence clocks in at around six minutes. Fukunaga and the crew ran through the whole thing seven times while the cameras were rolling. The director built in possible edit points if two takes had to be combined to make the perfect version of the shot, but anyone who is wondering should know that the sequence everyone saw in the episode is, in fact, a true single take and one of the great achievements of filmmaking for television - True Detective: How Did They Pull Off That Final Shot?
ZoomInfo

All told, the sequence clocks in at around six minutes. Fukunaga and the crew ran through the whole thing seven times while the cameras were rolling. The director built in possible edit points if two takes had to be combined to make the perfect version of the shot, but anyone who is wondering should know that the sequence everyone saw in the episode is, in fact, a true single take and one of the great achievements of filmmaking for television - True Detective: How Did They Pull Off That Final Shot?
ZoomInfo

All told, the sequence clocks in at around six minutes. Fukunaga and the crew ran through the whole thing seven times while the cameras were rolling. The director built in possible edit points if two takes had to be combined to make the perfect version of the shot, but anyone who is wondering should know that the sequence everyone saw in the episode is, in fact, a true single take and one of the great achievements of filmmaking for television - True Detective: How Did They Pull Off That Final Shot?
ZoomInfo

All told, the sequence clocks in at around six minutes. Fukunaga and the crew ran through the whole thing seven times while the cameras were rolling. The director built in possible edit points if two takes had to be combined to make the perfect version of the shot, but anyone who is wondering should know that the sequence everyone saw in the episode is, in fact, a true single take and one of the great achievements of filmmaking for television - True Detective: How Did They Pull Off That Final Shot?
ZoomInfo

All told, the sequence clocks in at around six minutes. Fukunaga and the crew ran through the whole thing seven times while the cameras were rolling. The director built in possible edit points if two takes had to be combined to make the perfect version of the shot, but anyone who is wondering should know that the sequence everyone saw in the episode is, in fact, a true single take and one of the great achievements of filmmaking for television - True Detective: How Did They Pull Off That Final Shot?
ZoomInfo

All told, the sequence clocks in at around six minutes. Fukunaga and the crew ran through the whole thing seven times while the cameras were rolling. The director built in possible edit points if two takes had to be combined to make the perfect version of the shot, but anyone who is wondering should know that the sequence everyone saw in the episode is, in fact, a true single take and one of the great achievements of filmmaking for television - True Detective: How Did They Pull Off That Final Shot?

(Source: oh-whiskers, via hotphotography)

Several automotive companies have begun replacing traditional controls in their cars with touch screens. Unfortunately, their eagerness to set new trends in hardware, is not matched by their ambition to create innovative software experiences for these new input mechanisms. Instead of embracing new constraints and opportunities, they merely replicate old button layouts and shapes on these new, flat, glowing surfaces.

So even controls for air condition and infotainment - which are commonly used while driving - now lack any tactile feedback and require the driver’s dexterity and attention when operated. Considering that distracted driving is the number one cause for car accidents, this is not a step in the right direction.

Read more

This reminds me similarly of when touch screens were first introduced into the world of PCs, and existing companies were trying to shoe-horn the design metaphors of a “keyboard and mouse” to something which obviously wasn’t suited to it.  

I’m not sure how discoverable some of the gestures are, or how easy they are to learn though it’s definitely a step in the right direction.